NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED350265
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Induction Practices at the District Level: Fact or Fiction.
Wideen, Marvin F.; McNally, Gregory W.
Induction of beginning teachers has become a significant issue in education for several reasons: teacher retention, personal and psychological assistance to beginning teachers, assessment, reform, and academic curiosity. This study examined school district induction practices in the province of British Columbia (Canada). The objectives of the study were: to determine whether induction programs existed, to identify the policies and practices that characterized the programs, and to observe how the reported policies and practices were actually being carried out in the districts. For the study, a model for beginning teacher induction involving four levels of teacher assistance was proposed and used as a rough template against which to view the practices in the districts. The first level of teacher assistance is the "nuts and bolts" level which includes assistance and orientation to the context of the workplace in which the beginning teacher will be employed. At the second level, beginning teachers receive psychological support. At the third level, programs deal with changes in teaching practice. The fourth level involves programs that focus on reflection and professional growth. Telephone interviews with district personnel in eight districts were used to obtain information on district policy; questionnaires were used to collect data from beginning teachers in two school districts about the kinds of assistance they actually received. Results based on 53 responses to the questionnaire indicated that: the districts appeared to be working primarily at the first level of the teacher assistance model; while induction is widely talked about at the district level, it has not yet become a serious and integral part of most school districts; and the assistance that beginning teachers received was more a function of the school atmosphere and help from significant colleagues than any planned district programs. (Contains 26 references.) (IAH)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: British Columbia
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).