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ERIC Number: ED349518
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Nov
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
"Doing Gender" and Conflicts over the Household Division of Labor.
Stohs, Joanne Hoven
It is well-established that women do the vast majority of household labor. West and Zimmerman's concept of "doing gender" suggests that sex inequity persists because housework enables women to demonstrate their gendered identities to others. However, changes in gendered norms for housework may be underway because recent studies indicate that women are reducing their amount of household labor and some are complaining about the burdens. Certain types of conflicts may be an indicator of women's growing sense of entitlement and a harbinger of change. This study explored conflicts over the household division of labor in regard to the "doing" of gender. A national sample of women (N=60) and men (N=57) responded to a survey requesting who did the majority of "female" household tasks; why those persons did housecleaning; their overall satisfaction with the division of labor; and types of conflicts experienced over the household division of labor. Demographic data were also collected. Results indicated that 80% of the women did the majority of the household tasks. However, reasons for housecleaning were as likely to be practical or preferential as gendered. Overall, conflicts were best predicted by dissatisfaction among young adults (20-39 years). Though gendered norms about household labor appear to be ambivalent among young adults, all women continue to perform such tasks in a gendered manner. (Contains 35 references and 4 tables.) (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Division of Labor (Household)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (44th, San Francisco, CA, November 22-26, 1991).