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ERIC Number: ED349509
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Aug
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Drug Involvement among Alcoholic Men: Relationships to Psychopathology and Adaptation.
Gonzalez, Fernando; And Others
Though significant evidence suggests that drug-using alcoholics (DUA) are more damaged psychologically, socially, and medically than non-drug-using alcoholics (NDUA), current research on adults offers no clear explanation for the differences. This study examined the psychological and demographic differences between (other) drug-using and non-drug-using alcoholics in a systematically drawn, population-based nonclinical sample of males (N=193) who were convicted of driving while impaired or driving while under the influence. Respondents varied in extent of their drug use and were categorized into one of five groups ranging from drug abusing/dependent alcoholics to controls who used neither alcohol nor other drugs at clinical levels. Higher levels of drug involvement were associated with higher rates of antisocial behavior and alcohol-related problems, and were inversely related to level of mental health, adaptive functioning, socioeconomic status, and education. These results indicate that alcohol and drug use are related to patterns of adaptation among a variety of non-drug specific domains, including extent of psychopathology, and demographic indices of adaptation. Overall, there was a downward trends in the level of education and socioeconomic status as the level of substance abuse increased. These findings are consistent with a theoretical view which posits that increasing drug involvement is part of a larger syndrome of social failure and psychological distress that does not appear to be drug specific in nature. (Author/ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Michigan State Dept. of Mental Health, Lansing.; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (100th, Washington, DC, August 14-18, 1992).