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ERIC Number: ED349283
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Discourse of Pedagogy and the Possibility of Social Change.
O'Loughlin, Michael
The thesis of this paper is that constructivism and similar pedagogic formulations are problematic because: (1) being nondialectical they close off possibilities for dialogue about issues such as those discussed in this paper; and (2) they are embedded in forms of discourse which privilege middle-class culture, values, language, and ways of knowing without theorizing the power relations implicit in this privilege. The paper argues that, as a result, these approaches end up reproducing the status quo and counter attempts to introduce emancipatory issues into pedagogical discourse. In this paper, drawing particularly on the writings of Bernstein (1990) and Bourdieu (1977), the intent is to illustrate how this process occurs and to explore the relations between the discourse of pedagogy and the possibility of social change. As Bernstein (1990) notes, for too long educators have talked about ways of practicing pedagogy without paying any critical attention to the language and assumptions in which pedagogy is embedded. This paper does not attempt to articulate new pedagogical solutions. Rather, it is hoped that by uncovering the problems, it will contribute to the kind of dialogue that will eventually lead to a richer and more equitable form of pedagogy. Before teacher educators attend to issues of "changing our students' beliefs about pedagogy," it is essential that they devote some attention to the taken-for-granted discourse in which their own thinking and practices are embedded. (Contains 37 references.) (Author/IAH)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Constructivism; Dialectical Reasoning
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).