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ERIC Number: ED349268
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Myth of the Teacher Resister: The Influence of Authenticity and Participation on Faculty Trust.
Busman, Douglas
This paper examines the influence of authenticity, teaming, and participation on faculty trust. Researchers mailed 437 public middle school teachers a survey which used an authenticity measure, a trust measure (trust in principals, colleagues, and organizations), a teacher involvement in decision making measure, and a question on daily grade level teaming. Teachers reported more trust in their colleagues than in their principals or organizations. Teacher participation in decision making was low. Principal authenticity is composed of three aspects: non manipulation of subordinates, salience of self over role, and accountability. Fully two-thirds of the teachers did not view their principals as authentic. Data analysis indicated that different levels of authenticity influenced aspects of trust in significantly different manners. The study emphasizes the importance of considering the interrelationships between the major variables when establishing a climate of trust within a school. Findings suggest that: teaming represents real reform, and it influences colleague trust, principal trust, and teacher perception of actual involvement in participation; as authenticity increases, trust in organization increases; and trust in the principal is based upon the perceived level of the principal's authenticity. (SM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Authenticity
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 26, 1992).