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ERIC Number: ED348930
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Aug-17
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Thinking about Learning from the Perspectives of Bruner and Ausubel.
Hartman, Hope J.
This paper describes a teacher preparation instructional unit on the "Structure of Knowledge" that was designed to help students learn to think like Jerome Bruner and David Ausubel rather than merely acquire knowledge about them, while simultaneously improving students' thinking skills. The unit used Sternberg's triarchic theory to identify thinking skills and to plan instructional activities intended to help students think more intelligently about their academic work. The goals of the instructional unit were for students to: (1) use their knowledge about Bruner and Ausubel; (2) gain experience in assessing and preparing instructional materials; and (3) improve their intellectual skills within the contexts of both learning and teaching. The unit was tested with 23 college students enrolled in "Human Learning and Instruction" in which all students were required to keep a journal about out-of-class teaching episodes in which they connect course concepts with their own teaching experience. There were three primary learning activities in the unit: representation preference essays; handout analysis; and handout design. Unit evaluation data showed that students found all three instructional activities worthwhile and that the unit succeeded in helping students think like the theorists. The appendix includes background information on Bruner's and Ausubel's theories and Sternberg's triarchic theory of intelligence, a lesson plan, and handouts. (GLR)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Information Analyses; Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Bruner (Jerome S); David P Ausubel; Triarchic Theory of Intelligence (Sternberg)
Note: Paper presnted at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (99th, San Francisco, CA, August 16-20, 1991).