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ERIC Number: ED348749
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
An Evaluation of the Impact of Local Needs Assessments on Tennessee's Incentive Program.
Bellon, Jerry J.; And Others
Tennessee's Comprehensive Educational Reform act of 1984 created a widely publicized career-ladder program that provided extended contract opportunities as incentives to teachers receiving level II or III status. A comprehensive evaluation study found that extended contract expenditures and resource-allocation processes were not always driven by student needs. This paper reports results of a 1991-92 study to determine Tennessee schools' progress in implementing the needs assessment mandated in 1988 legislation. The study also aimed to identify difficulties in meeting established guidelines, determine significant areas of student concern, and determine how the needs assessment process affected the extended contract program and overall education efforts. Methodology included analysis of needs assessment reports submitted during 1991-92 and previous years and semistructured interviews with a stratified random sample (34 percent) of the 143 extended contract coordinators who conducted needs assessments. Findings showed an improvement in needs assessment report quality during the 3-year implementation period. Primary student concerns were improvement of academic performance, expansion of academic opportunities, reduction of at-risk and dropout numbers, and improvement of parent involvement. The needs assessment process was congruent with extended contract program goals and improved overall education efforts. Appendices contain ratings of needs assessments, areas of prioritized needs, and a ranking of student needs. (MLH)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Comprehensive Education Reform Act (Tennessee); Extended Contracts
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).