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ERIC Number: ED348588
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Aug
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Client Use of Impression Management in Counseling.
Lawson, Ward M.; And Others
Analogue studies have demonstrated that clients who have been instructed to try to deliberately produce certain impressions in their counselors are able to create those impressions reliably and to affect the counselors' evaluations of the clients. It has not been demonstrated, however, that actual clients engage in strategic self-presentation with their counselors. This study tested that proposition with high school students (N=113) enrolled in junior- and senior-level sociology classes. The students completed an adjective checklist which was designed for this study and which consisted of three sets of adjectives (scales) which were developed to detect the self-presentation strategies of supplication, intimidation, and self-promotion. Subjects were divided into four groups, three of which were led to anticipate meeting with a counselor (a male, a female, or sex unspecified). These subjects also completed the Counselor Rating Form-Short (CRF-S) in anticipation of meeting with the counselor. Differences in the self-presentations among the groups were tested using the MANOVA procedures. In general, subjects who anticipated meeting with a counselor did not self-present differently from those who would not be meeting with a counselor. However, among subjects who did expect to meet a counselor, those expecting to meet with a female counselor presented themselves as less self-promoting and intimidating. No differences among subjects' CRF-S ratings (attractiveness, trustworthiness, expertness) of their anticipated counselor were found. (Author/ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: High School Juniors
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (100th, Washington, DC, August 14-18, 1992).