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ERIC Number: ED348409
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988-Sep
Pages: 239
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Black Health Issues in New York State: Condition, Prognosis, Prescription. Volume 1, Health.
New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Black Affairs, Albany.
An examination of the health status of blacks in each phase of the life cycle in New York State indicates a significant discrepancy between the health status of black and white New Yorkers, and a clear link between poverty and poor health. The following life stages were examined and key health issues were identified: (1) prenatal/newborn; (2) infancy; (3) childhood; (4) adolescence; (5) adulthood; and (6) old age. Detailed policy recommendations that emphasize community-based services, manpower needs, and education are suggested for each area. The following summary issues are discussed: (1) early prenatal care, nutrition, and immunization; (2) health and social services to prevent adolescent alienation; (3) preventive health care to combat the six most common causes of death among adults (cancer, cardiovascular disease and stroke, chemical dependency, diabetes, homicide, and accidents); (4) social support services to combat Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS); and (5) access to health care services for the elderly. Statistical data are included on 14 tables. Summaries of public hearings held in Buffalo and New York City are also included. Brief descriptions of the following programs are appended: (1) New York State teenage pregnancy and parenting programs, 1986; (2) violence prevention strategies; and (3) New York State Office of the Aging (SOFA) policies and programs aimed at elderly blacks. (FMW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Black Affairs, Albany.
Identifiers: New York
Note: For preliminary reports on this topic, see ED 313 472-473. For related documents, see UD 027 246-253.