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ERIC Number: ED348392
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Mathematics and Reading Test Equating.
Lee, Ong Kim; Wright, Benjamin D.
As part of a larger project to assess changes in student learning resulting from school reform, this study equates levels 6 through 14 of the mathematics and reading comprehension components of Form 7 of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) with levels 7 through 14 of the mathematics and reading comprehension components of the CPS90 (another version of the ITBS), using a Rasch analysis. The analysis results in the common calibration of all 1,031 mathematics items found in the 17 levels of the two test forms to define a mathematics variable and all 602 reading items to define a reading variable. Each item in each subject obtains a person-free calibration (in logits) of its own level of difficulty on one common scale linking all items of that subject. The 17 levels of the two tests were successfully equated so that a person taking the CPS90 or Form 7 (or a combination of items from the forms targeted at his or her ability level) will obtain statistically equivalent measures of ability. Logit measures give a more accurate picture of student rate of growth than do grade equivalents, with rates of growth highest at the lower grades and decreasing in the higher grades. Four tables, 13 figures, and 6 references are included. An appendix lists the criterion definitions of variables. (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Spencer Foundation, Chicago, IL.
Authoring Institution: Chicago Panel on Public School Policy and Finance, IL.; Chicago Univ., IL. Center for School Improvement.; Chicago Public Schools, IL.
Identifiers: Chicago Public Schools IL; Iowa Tests of Basic Skills; Logits; Rasch Model; Reform Efforts; Test Equivalence
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).