NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED348264
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Apr-12
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Struggle among Saints: Black Women in the YWCA, 1860-1920.
Jones, Adrienne Lash
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was an extremely popular organization among black women. During this time the YWCA enjoyed a reputation as a leader in interracial affairs. Internally, however, the structure of the YWCA protected the prevailing racial status quo. Black women were served almost exclusively in separate branches, and while there were black staff members, there was no black representation on the National Board, nor on city Association boards. Black women undertook to participate effectively within the YWCA and overcame the structural and ideological barriers with which they were faced. By 1920, while its structure was flawed and racially based, the YWCA provided a forum in which black women could talk with white women, and demonstrate their readiness to address issues of class, gender, and race. (DB)
Oberlin College, Department of Black Studies, Rice 214, Oberlin, OH 44074.
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Historical Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Young Womens Christian Association
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians (Louisville, KY, April 1991).