NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED348184
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Small Schools and Higher Order Thinking Skills.
Haller, Emil J.; And Others
A review of the literature indicates that, compared to larger, urban schools, small, rural secondary schools have limited course offerings in mathematics and science; the review also indicates, however, that the achievement of students in small, rural schools is equivalent to or even higher than, that of students in larger, urban schools. Such an anomaly may be due to a mismatch of the conventional measurement of achievement outcomes and the neglect of higher-order cognitive skills taught in advanced courses offered only in larger schools. This study examines another possible explanation for the anomaly by focusing on the measures of higher-order thinking skills in science and mathematics. The data used in this study were collected beginning in 1987 by the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), an on-going 4-year panel study of middle and high school science and mathematics education. The base-year sample consisted of 2,829 10th grade students from 51 randomly selected public schools. Survey instruments were completed by the sampled students, their teachers, and parents. Achievement tests that focused on mathematics and science knowledge and higher-order thinking skills were administered in the fall of 1987, 1988, and 1989. Zero-order statistics and regression analyses were performed with the data. Results of the study refute the hypothesis and indicate that while large schools offer more advanced courses than do small ones, those offerings appear to have no influence on student achievement and higher-order thinking skills. (LP)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Consortium for Policy Research in Education, New Brunswick, NJ.
Identifiers: Longitudinal Study of American Youth
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).