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ERIC Number: ED347883
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Program Topics Identified by Faculty and Students as Important for Program Evaluation in a Problem-Based Medical School Curriculum.
Brandon, Paul R.; And Others
In the course of developing a program evaluation scheme, a study was done of program topics identified as important to problem-based learning (PBL) by faculty and students at the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) at the University of Hawaii (Manoa) where a PBL curriculum is used. The study interviewed and surveyed key stakeholders, asking about the program topics an evaluation should address and priorities among the suggested topics. Data were collected from 8 basic science and 8 clinical faculty involved in the planning and administration of the curriculum and 10 students. In addition, about 40 first-year students and 25 second-year students participated in separate group interviews. The results were content analyzed and summarized into 43 program topics in 9 categories. A second survey was done to collect responses on how the topics should be prioritized. This process revealed some differences between faculty and students in ranking of topics and eventually resulted in the following ranking for the top half of the scale (51-100): (1) tenets of the program; (2) understanding and practice of PBL; (3) knowledge and skills; (4) competent, caring, ethical, and well-adjusted physicians; (5) psychosocial and population knowledge; (6) congruence and consistency of curricular methods; (7) affective environment; (8) student assessment; and (9) teaching environment. Included are 1 table, an appendix containing results, and 16 references. (JB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: University of Hawaii Manoa
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).