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ERIC Number: ED347227
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
An Introduction to the Hmong. New Faces of Liberty Series.
Walker, Wendy
Characteristics of the Hmong refugees to the United States are described, with emphasis on educational problems. Historians agree that the Hmong lived in China until about 1810 when they began to migrate to Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. The evacuation of U.S. troops from Saigon in 1975 marked the beginning to the first wave of Southeast Asian refugees to the United States. Hmong immigrants have arrived in the United States in four waves, settling largely in California, Minneapolis-Saint Paul (Minnesota), and Providence (Rhode Island). School districts in these areas have only begun to cope with the problem of understanding and meeting the unusual needs of Hmong students as they adjust to American schools. Hmong children come from a culture that was tribal, essentially pre-literate, and pre-technological. The impact of the Hmong culture on behavior in U.S. schools is felt in the areas of: (1) cultural identity; (2) learning style; (3) oral, rather than written, tradition; (4) role models for males and the lack of educated role models for females; (5) early marriage; (6) high fertility rate; (7) tension for females between traditional roles and the desire for education; and (8) school dropouts. There is a great need for bicultural counselors for Hmong children because the norms of Hmong life are vastly different than the life they lead in American schools. There is a 49-item list of references. (SLD)
New Faces of Liberty/SFSC, P.O. Box 5646, San Francisco, CA 94101 ($2.50 per essay plus $1 tax, postage, and handling; or $15 for the series of eight essays plus $2 tax, postage, and handling).
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Zellerbach Family Fund, San Francisco, CA.; California Univ., Berkeley. Graduate School of Education.
Identifiers: China; Language Minorities; Laos; Thailand; United States; Vietnam
Note: For related documents, see UD 028 657-662.