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ERIC Number: ED347207
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Maternal Beliefs and Children's Learning: A Developmental Perspective.
Cogan, Leland S.; Oka, Evelyn R.
The developmental pattern in the relationships among mothers' beliefs about structure, autonomy, control, and intelligence was studied, addressing: (1) how mothers' scaffolding beliefs and conceptions of intelligence are related; (2) the relationship of these maternal beliefs to children's age and achievement; and (3) the relationship between these maternal beliefs and children's beliefs and achievement as a function of intelligence. Subjects were 12 second graders, 18 fifth graders, and their mothers from 3 elementary schools in a metropolitan school district. Mothers completed beliefs and family background questionnaires. Children completed a perceived competence test from the Self-Perception Profile for Children and a conceptions of intelligence scale developed for the study. Correlations between mothers' intelligence theory and children's achievement were statistically different in the two grades. Mothers' scaffolding beliefs did not consistently relate to children's achievement in either grade, and structure beliefs were not significantly related to any child measures at either grade. Mothers' autonomy beliefs were only significantly related to mathematics achievement in grade 2. Control beliefs were correlated with achievement for grade 5. Results demonstrate that while the mean levels of maternal beliefs do not differ according to the child's grade, the way in which they are related does change. Implications are discussed. Five tables present study data. An appendix contains the Parental Beliefs Questionnaire Scales, and there is a 23-item list of references. (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Control Perception
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).