NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED346122
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Social Support Level and Satisfaction as Predictors of Personal Agency Beliefs in Adolescence.
Love, Robin L.; And Others
The relative importance of adolescents' levels of perceived social support and their satisfaction with their supportive relationships in terms of predicting personal agency beliefs (an individual's capability and context beliefs) was studied with data collected from 174 upper-middle class high school students (75 males and 99 females) in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), aged from 16 to 18 years. Participants' social support level and degree of satisfaction were assessed using the Youth Social Support Questionnaire. Personal agency beliefs were measured using the Assessment of Personal Agency Beliefs, measuring the capability and context beliefs that individuals hold in relation to common life goals. A one-way analysis of variance was performed using the following four social support groups as independent variables: (1) high satisfaction/high level; (2) high satisfaction/low level; (3) low satisfaction/high level; and (4) low satisfaction/low level. Five selected goals, most related to emotional health and competence in interpersonal relationships, were dependent variables. Results reveal significant group differences for both capability and context beliefs for all five goals, suggesting that when students are satisfied with their social support, the level (the number of relationships) seems to make little difference. Several theories regarding why level of perceived support is not equally satisfying are examined, and possible directions for future research are suggested. There is one table of study data, and a 21-item list of references. (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Assessment of Personal Agency Beliefs; Youth Social Support Questionnaire
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).