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ERIC Number: ED345841
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Planning for Development in Multiracial Primary Schools.
McMahon, Agnes; Wallace, Mike
This paper reports the findings of research on the plans of multiracial primary schools in England to implement a series of innovations in the educational system. The Education Reform Acts of 1986 and 1988 instituted innovations which included: (1) a national curriculum; (2) nationally imposed salaries; (3) a national teacher appraisal scheme; (4) school budgets for staff development; and (5) monitoring of school performance. The research involved interviews with 22 Local Education Authority personnel about innovations being implemented in the schools, and interviews with 24 headteachers about a range of issues connected with development planning. The findings revealed that planning for change occurred alongside the planning that was required to maintain existing practice, and that the most significant factor affecting development planning was the large number of innovations that the schools were addressing. One of the main values of the development planning in most schools was the focusing of staff on shared priorities. Headteachers played a key role in the process of development planning, while the role of schools' governing bodies was a minor one. In general, school staff sought to inform parents about developments rather than gather their views beforehand. Several hypotheses about current development planning are suggested and recommendations for policymakers and school practitioners are offered. Nine references are cited. (BC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: England; Local Education Authorities (United Kingdom); Multiracial Education
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).