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ERIC Number: ED345296
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-May
Pages: 249
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Needs Assessment Model for College Writing Program Evaluation.
Hollandsworth, Linda
A study designed a model for evaluating college writing programs by means of an analysis of the most important component, students. The study was conducted at the University of South Carolina Coastal Carolina College and involved first-year students. Subjects, six students who scored one (on a scale from one to four) on the holistically scored placement essay test, were interviewed, observed in a classroom setting and in informal situations, and kept memory journals for eight weeks. Subjects' high school teachers and parents were also interviewed. Results indicated that: (1) the needs assessment/discrepancy model provided direct qualitative data important for decision-makers in planning a writing program and an evaluation at the college level; (2) a need exists to design a program of writing that revolves around the treatment of the recursive aspect of composing; (3) instructors in the writing program should utilize the social and cultural backgrounds of students, encouraging them to write about their own experiences; (4) students need more opportunity for personal writing; (5) a "real audience" component of writing, either school- or community-based, should be included; (6) a book of student writings should be used as supplementary reading material; and (7) students lacked self-confidence. The model reveals the need for a closer examination of students' needs (their prior writing and educational experiences) so that a program of instruction can be designed to meet those needs. (Nine tables and 10 figures of data are included; the course syllabus, interview questions, sample memory journal entries, and sample interviews are attached.) (RS)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: University of South Carolina Coastal Carolina Coll
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana University of Pennsylvania.