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ERIC Number: ED345250
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Mar-20
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Valuing Student Texts/Students Valuing Texts.
McClure, Michael F.
Being a teacher of writing carries certain ideological implications, not the least of which is the fact that the teacher must participate in and perpetuate an educational system which works effects in and upon society that are repugnant. Overall, teachers work to maintain a status quo that shrugs its shoulders at many inequalities and injustices of race, gender, class, etc. As a group, writing instructors are highly idealistic people, allowing them to continue to strive even in conditions as they now stand. The goal of writing instruction, "literacy," is itself embedded in ideology, so that no single conception of "literacy" serves all cultural groups. Accordingly, when monolithic conceptions of education remain unquestioned, it is discouraging, if not downright frightening. Theories embracing the notion of "discourse conventions," such as that of David Bartholomae, actually encourage students to submit to existing social and political power relationships, and betray elitist and sexist stances. In contrast to the "discourse conventions" position are stances which acknowledge the "discussion of difference" in constructive ways, such as Donald Murray's emphasis on personal codes and the autobiographical nature of all writing. As Nancy Sommers has contended, the kinds of writing that students are encouraged to produce has been artificially limited, largely through the oppressive nature of contemporary institutions. Thus teachers must value students' purposes, perspectives, and texts if they hope to convince them to value the texts of others. (HB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Bartholomae (David); Composition Theory; Expressive Writing; Murray (Donald M)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (43rd, Cincinnati, OH, March 19-21, 1992).