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ERIC Number: ED344918
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 44
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Learning Strategies on a Group of Black Secondary Students' Verbal and Mathematics SAT Scores.
Payne, Oscar L.
Using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, this study examined the effects of 11 learning strategies variables, ability, and gender on the verbal and mathematics Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores of approximately 300 black high school seniors. The students took the SAT during the fall of the 1989-90 school year. Learning strategies variables were: (1) rehearsal; (2) elaboration; (3) organization; (4) critical thinking; (5) planning; (6) monitoring; (7) self-regulation; (8) time and study environment; (9) effort; (10) peer help; and (11) help-seeking behavior. Multiple regression equations demonstrated that the self-regulation variable had significant positive effects on verbal and mathematics SAT scores. Help-seeking behavior had significant positive effects on the verbal score, while critical thinking had an inverse effect on the mathematics score. Ability had significant positive effects on both scores, while significant sex differences were found for self-regulation strategies in favor of males for verbal and mathematics scores. While the effect of organization was positive in favor of females on the mathematics SAT scores, the effect of critical thinking was inverse. Ability favored females on the verbal SAT scores and males on the mathematics scores. Results are significant in view of efforts to help black students improve SAT scores. One figure and 3 tables present study findings, and there is a 50-item list of references. (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire; Scholastic Aptitude Test
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992). For a related document, see TM 018 248.