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ERIC Number: ED344664
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Sep
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Scripts for Children's Lives: What Do Parents and Early Childhood Teachers Contribute to Children's Understanding of Events in Their Lives?
Dalli, Carmen
"Scripts" are ways of describing the knowledge a person must have in order to understand the appropriate response in a given situation. In this document, literature on the ways in which children acquire scripts for social behavior through interaction with others is reviewed, and some departures from script theory are discussed. It is noted that most theories of human development acknowledge that interaction with adults is critical for a child's social, emotional, and cognitive growth. Examples of studies that use notions from script theory and a Vygotskian perspective to explain children's understanding of social events are provided. The final section of the paper describes a progress report on a project investigating the contributions made to children's event scripts by parents and by teachers in an early childhood center attended by the children. The project began as an effort to study the idea that parents and early childhood staff play complementary roles in children's lives. The methodology took account of both psychological and social processes. It was concluded that the event of becoming part of a group might be a good context for studying the contribution of staff and parents to children's understanding of the early childhood center. Contains 29 references. (LB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Scripts (Knowledge Structures)
Note: Paper presented at the Early Childhood Convention (5th, Dunedin, New Zealand, September 8-12, 1991).