NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED344141
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Aug
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Parental Age and Parenting Quality as Perceived by Late Adolescents.
Finley, Gordon E.; And Others
This study attempted to improve on the shortcomings of a much publicized previous study (Morris, 1988) which examined the effects of parenting at an older age and concluded that children of older parents had a generally unfavorable view of late parenting and would not choose it for themselves. For the new study, data was gathered from college students (N=415) who were born to parents who ranged in age from their teens to their fifth decade of life. Two identical Affective Quality of Parenting Scales (father, mother) were derived from fixed response questionnaire items designed to tap the major issues raised by Morris. Results indicated that Morris was substantially in error. For mothers there was no significant relationship between maternal age and maternal affective quality of parenting. For fathers, a significant bell shaped curvilinear relationship emerged. Fathers in their 30s were perceived as yielding a higher affective quality of parenting than both younger and older fathers while younger and older fathers were perceived at similar levels. Children did not believe that they received a lower affective quality of parenting at the hands of older parents than they received at the hands of younger parents. The media attention given to Morris' work is misleading and perhaps damaging to older parents, to prospective older parents, and to prospective older adoptive parents. This negative media image of older parents created, or reinforced, by Morris requires correction. (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Florida International Univ., Miami.; Grant (W.T.) Foundation, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Late Parenthood
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (99th, San Francisco, CA, August 16-20, 1991).