NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED343564
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
The Cross-Cultural Study of Human-Computer Interaction: A Review of Research Methodology, Technology Transfer, and the Diffusion of Innovation.
Day, Donald L.
This paper examines the methodological literature of cross-cultural research to establish whether the means exist to identify culturally biased preconceptions implicit in human-computer interfaces, and to develop interfaces more attuned to the cultural differences of the users. It is the premise of this paper that cultural conditioning affects individuals' responses to technology and that in developing nations such conditioning can seriously impede the transfer of information and gains in productivity anticipated from the use of computerized equipment. The review of research methods examines questions of research design, tool construction, measurement, and results analysis. Tools described include a moving percentage scale, an externally defined satisfaction scale applied to professionals, and a composite index combining proven behavioral indicators. Nine types of measurement strategies are discussed along with their corresponding equivalence assumptions. Attempts to deal with systematic error by the use of longitudinal design and the perils of response acquiescence and subjects' moods are also reviewed. It is concluded that none of the methodologies described addresses the full range of problems in technology transfer and diffusion of innovation that underlie the study of interaction in man machine systems in the Third World. Key factors in technology transfer that frustrate research are identified as: (1) social, behavioral, and resource requirements of the technology; (2) corresponding characteristics of the target population and its environment; and (3) compatibility of the technology and the population. (84 references) (Author/DB)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the National Conference on Librarians and International Development (3rd, Corvallis, OR, April 30, 1991).