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ERIC Number: ED341732
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Jan
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Power Assessment and the Delphi Process.
Eason, Sandra
The Delphi process provides a technique for scientific inquiry within the context of group interactions by generating information and seeking a consensus through a series of interactive probes. In a study of the effects of power on the allocation of resources in the organizational setting of public elementary schools, the Delphi technique was used for the assessment of power. This paper describes the process from conceptualization to collection of data, with specific reference to background, rationale, and development of the probes. The inquiry was conducted through interviews with: (1) three male and three female principals; (2) three males and one female with positions as central office administrators; and (3) two male university faculty members. In all, the 12 persons interviewed consisted of 5 blacks and 7 whites. An initial probe was conducted by an interview exploring the ways schools influence district allocations. Questionnaires were used in three additional probes, each dependent on the previous probe. The final questionnaire assessed school power across 79 public elementary schools on 3 consensually shared dimensions as follows: (1) politically astute parents; (2) politically astute principals; and (3) participation of community groups in solving school problems. Results indicate the relative influences of schools on resource allocations in the district. It is concluded that the methodological qualities of the Delphi technique complemented the design of the study. A table presents descriptions of the panelists. A 13-item list of references and the 2 questionnaires used are included. (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southwest Educational Research Association (Houston, TX, January-February 1992).