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ERIC Number: ED341294
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991
Pages: 76
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Predictive Validity of the Wide Range Achievement Test and Achievement Scores of ESOL Adults.
Wilcox, Wilma B.
The need in adult education English-for-Speakers-of-Other-Languages (ESOL) classes for a simple, effective placement measure that is inexpensive in terms of both cost and time is noted, and results of a study of the predictive validity of the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) on the achievement scores of adult ESOL students are reported. The WRAT is regularly used in the Johnson County Community College district in Kansas, where this study was conducted among 169 students representing a variety of ages, nationalities, and previous levels of education. Four subtests of the WRAT, Level I and II Reading and Level I and II Spelling, were administered and measured for predictive ability against the achievement shown on the Basic English Skills Test (BEST) and the Real-Life English Placement Survey. Results indicated that the WRAT has more than face validity and can be considered an adequate predictor of placement levels for ESOL students. Because this test appears to evaluate only the speaking or barking (reading without understanding) aspect of word attack skills in reading, it is recommended that the testing be augmented with function-activity testing, behaviorally anchored to the instructional materials. Seven appendices contain sections of the WRAT test, the BEST test, the Real-Life English Placement Survey, and item analyses for WRAT-I Reading and BEST. Contains 24 references. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse on Literacy Education) (LB)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses; Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Basic English Skills Test; Real Life English Placement Survey; Wide Range Achievement Test
Note: Master's project, University of Kansas. Appended material may not reproduce well.