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ERIC Number: ED338919
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Nov
Pages: 5
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0889-8049
Youth Training in the U.S., Great Britain, and Australia. NCEE Brief Number 12.
Inger, Morton
An initial analysis of self-reported, formal, postschool job training and the labor market outcomes of that training in Great Britain, Australia, and the United States was made through a study of survey results in each of the countries. The data revealed that there is not one kind of training, but various kinds for different purposes, with important differences among training sources, their determinants, and their consequences for wages and employment. The data also showed different patterns of skill acquisition over the early work career, varying by education, demographic group, and apprenticeship status in each country, as well as across countries. Some specific findings are the following: (1) in all three countries, the level of schooling attained by a worker is an important predictor of postschool training and labor market success, better-educated workers are more likely to receive employer-provided training, and employer-provided training has the greatest effect on raising wages and reducing unemployment; (2) in the United States, workers receive low initial levels of training but accumulate more training with time on the job, whereas in Great Britain and Australia, training is concentrated in the early work years; (3) in the United States, most training is provided by employers, whereas in the other two countries, it is mostly provided by schools and other off-the-job sources; (4) in the United States, training yields higher returns, in terms of wages, than in the other countries; and (5) poorer youths in all three countries receive less training. (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Center on Education and the Economy, Rochester, NY.
Identifiers: Australia; Great Britain; United States
Note: For the document on which this brief is based, see ED 336 616.