NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED338716
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Oct
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
When Control Groups Do Not Exist: Program Evaluation without a Net.
Clark, Sheldon B.; And Others
Suggestions, based on the experience of researchers at Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Associated Universities (ORAU), are offered on how evaluations in which true experimental designs are not possible can be designed for meaningful comparison. The ORAU conducts evaluation and assessment studies of educational programs intended to explore some aspect of the production of scientists and engineers (S/Es) in the United States. To assess these programs in the absence of traditional control groups, researchers have turned to several national databases. Questions and response items from large national studies sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and other agencies make possible the comparison of program participants with national norms. Among NSF surveys used are: (1) Survey of Earned Doctorates; (2) Survey of Doctorate Recipients; (3) Survey of Recent Science, Social Science, and Engineering Graduates (New Entrants Survey); and (4) National Survey of Natural and Social Scientists and Engineers (Survey of Experienced S/Es). Only clearly relevant items are selected. These techniques are not a panacea but can be helpful when it makes sense to compare program participants with external or general populations. A seven-item list of references is included. Figures 1 through 5 give examples of items adopted for comparison. Figures 6 through 10 illustrate general and definitive comparison groups. (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.
Identifiers: Oak Ridge Associated Universities TN
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Evaluation Association (Chicago, IL, October 31-November 2, 1991).