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ERIC Number: ED338559
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Apr
Pages: 39
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Beyond Constructivism: Toward a Dialectical Model of the Problematics of Teacher Socialization.
O'Loughlin, Michael
This paper presents a critical analysis of the forms of constructivism that owe their origin either directly or indirectly to Piaget's theory. The paper is organized into three sections. The first provides a brief synopsis of the structuralist assumptions underlying Piagetian theory and then demonstrates the ways in which these assumptions underlie other constructivist educational approaches. The second section of the paper criticizes the constructivist position especially as found in a position statement of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (1988) on what constitutes developmentally appropriate education for children ages 5-8. The critique argues that many of the epistemological assumptions underlying Piagetian constructivism are extremely problematic and impede the possibilities for developing a learner-centered pedagogy. This is so because the subjectivity of individual learners is ignored; the political, social, cultural, historical, and economic contexts in which school learning takes place remain unacknowledged; the context-specificity of cognition is not addressed; and the notion of student-centered pedagogy is presented without any attempt to take into account the disparities in power relations that necessarily exist between teachers and students in school settings. The final section outlines an alternative theoretical foundation for school learning, one that takes seriously issues of discourse, power, dialogue, context, and subjectivity. (Author/LL)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Constructivism; National Association Educ of Young Children; Teacher Socialization
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, April 3-7, 1991).