NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED337815
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Jul
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Implementing the Study of Multicultural Aesthetics in Film and Video.
Gutenko, Gregory
Film and television in the western world are highly stylized and culturally specific products. A course on multicultural aesthetics in film and video should introduce the student to perceptual alternatives in film and television use. Some of these alternatives can be derived from three well-established areas of film/television study: the representational/reproductive cinema; non-European film and video; and experimental film and video. This proposed course design for multicultural aesthetics in film and video is highly influenced by the work of Sol Worth and John Adair (1966). Basic production courses are recommended prerequisites, since media production exercises are an essential part of the course design. A fundamental premise of this course is that for a Native American student, who might be attending the Haskell Indian Junior College in Lawrence, Kansas, the "Standard Average European" (SAE) media concept may be the alien concept, and somewhere in the non-SAE perspectives may be the appropriate "Standard Native American" concept. Production exercises on videotape should be carried out using consumer grade camera/recorder combinations to minimize devoting attention to technical operations and to allow emphasis on application. The course content of multicultural aesthetics in film and video should be fundamentally directed towards establishing contrasts between SAE and non-SAE rules of structure, content, and imaging. (A list of suggested reading materials and a list of films and videotapes to be shown in class are included; 21 references are attached.) (RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Haskell Indian Junior College KS; Native Americans
Note: Paper presented at the International Colloquium on Communication (12th, Lausanne, Switzerland, July 1990).