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ERIC Number: ED337798
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Peer Observation for Instructor Training and Program Development.
Storla, Steven R.
The Third College at the University of California, San Diego developed a peer observation program in which first-year composition instructors (mostly graduate teaching assistants) observe each other once per quarter. The peer observation program is not part of the process by which the writing program directors evaluate the instructors, but instructors' participation is required. The benefits from the program have been great: (1) peer observation lets instructors see students from a different angle of vision; (2) new instructors are receptive to learning from someone on their own level; (3) observers see new teaching technique in an actual classroom setting; and (4) there is value in receiving a classroom visitor. Several variations on models of peer observation techniques are possible. The program benefits include better communication among instructors, an enhanced sense of instructional mission, an improved atmosphere of cooperation in the program, and more confidence and self-esteem on the part of the instructors. In 1992, the program will be linked to social science and humanities courses. Because of its formative and exploratory nature, peer observation enables any writing program to become more collegial as it helps individual instructors to become more reflective of their own practices and more supportive of one another. (A peer observation form and lists of the focal areas for classroom observers and class observation categories are attached.) (RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: University of California San Diego
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (42nd, Boston, MA, March 21-23, 1991).