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ERIC Number: ED337773
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar-23
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
A Real-World Writer Reenters the Classroom: Stumbling Blocks and Stepping Stones.
Addison, Elizabeth
After several years in academic public relations, a professional writer returned to teaching composition. After her first attendance at the annual meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, she experienced a turning point in her view of "the essay." Following the conference, she changed her assignments from standard expository essays to other forms, such as writing personal letters, allowing the students to tap into their own personal experiences. Three papers written by the same student illustrate the positive changes that occurred. Later, an article on rhetorical axiology provided the instructor/writer with a theoretical base to understand what had happened, and she began to relate this to her personal writing experiences which were targeted for specific audiences, and which were improved by the use of a word processor. As the writer began to teach composition, using "Helping Circles," journal writing, and prewriting, and emphasizing inner experience, she found that there were still problems in getting her students to write expressively and with rhetorical value. Finally, she decided to teach her own writing process--to write along with the students, something she never thought about doing with her students when she was a graduate student. Now, she hopes to transfer more of the strengths of professional writing to the freshman composition course. Letter writing has been her most frequent solution, because it makes audience and rhetorical situation easy for students to adopt. (PRA)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Composition Theory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (42nd, Boston, MA, March 21-23, 1991).