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ERIC Number: ED337655
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Jul
Pages: 62
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
CASAS Statewide Accountability System for Federally Funded 321 Adult Basic Education Programs. An Adult Education 2000 Project. July 1, 1990-June 30, 1991.
Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System, San Diego, CA.
An 11-point plan was developed by the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) in cooperation with the California Department of Education for the 1990-91 year. Major program objectives were designed to enhance agency involvement, identify underlying causes of student attrition, examine test administration and security practices, expand adult basic education (ABE) pre-post progress testing, facilitate data collection at the local level, and expand training and technical assistance services. Some of the goal-related accomplishments of the project were the following: (1) new appraisal and placement instruments were developed; (2) scannable answer sheets were developed to facilitate data collection; (3) the program manual for ABE 321 grant programs was updated; (4) fall training and ongoing training and technical assistance were provided to more than 248 participants statewide; (5) 28 percent more data were collected; and (6) a statewide accountability report was prepared. (Twenty-three figures and 6 tables report the data gathered by the project, such as gender, age, ethnic background, number of school years, reason for enrollment, and program type for ABE students; and student achievement and progress according to mean reading and listening scores and goal attainment.) (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Youth, Adult and Alternative Educational Services Div.
Authoring Institution: Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System, San Diego, CA.
Identifiers: Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System