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ERIC Number: ED337627
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Oct
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Breaking Ground: A Study of Gestalt Therapy Theory and Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice.
Hartung, Paul J.
In both Gestalt therapy and Holland's theory of vocational choice, person-environment interaction receives considerable emphasis. Gestalt therapy theory suggests that people make contact (that is, meet needs) through a characteristic style of interacting with the environment. Holland identifies six personality types in his theory and asserts that persons of each type thrive in a corresponding environment. A correlational method was used to investigate whether particular Holland types use a characteristic style of contact to meet needs. A sample of 46 college graduate and undergraduate students responded to the Gestalt Personal Homeostasis Inventory (GPHI) and the Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI). The results revealed several significant associations between certain scores on both instruments, namely, that: (1) high VPI Realistic scores correlated with low GPHI Confluence scores; (2) VPI Investigative scale correlated negatively with GPHI Introjection and Confluence and positively with Awareness and Withdrawal/Closure; (3) VPI Conventional scale correlated negatively with GPHI Action; and (4) VPI Artistic scale correlated positively with GPHI Sensation and Excitement and negatively with Projection and Retroflection. The results encourage further research toward the goal of assimilating these two theoretical models into a comon conceptual framework. (13 references) (Author/NLA)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Gestalt Personal Homeostasis Inventory; Hollands Theory of Occupational Choice; Vocational Preference Inventory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-Western Educational Research Association (13th, Chicago, IL, October 1991).