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ERIC Number: ED337516
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Apr
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Growing Up in a Single-Parent Family: Some Not-So-Negative Effects on Adolescent Females' Plans for the Future.
Karraker, Meg Wilkes
This paper explores the impact of single-parent families on adolescent females and their aspirations for the future. The study, taking data from the national longitudinal High School and Beyond (HSB) study, uses a stratified weighted national sample of 4,573 black and white high school senior females in the class of 1980. The sample includes girls who were living with their mothers or other female guardians at the time they participated in the HSB study. Analysis using multiple regression reveals that, when other variables such as race, family income, mother's education, mother's employment status, and mother's occupation are controlled, girls living with their mothers are more likely to plan for higher education and delay or forgo marriage than are girls who lived with both a mother and a father-figure. The study also indicates that when other factors are controlled, black females plan to marry at later ages than do white females. Also, those from high income families and those with more educated mothers plan to marry at later ages than do other girls. The possible reasons for these patterns may be freedom from traditional gender roles or a high value on self-reliance. This research indicates that successful prediction of females' plans for education and marriage are not consistent with a "culture of poverty" thesis. Statistical data are presented in two tables. A list of 21 references is appended. (JB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: High School and Beyond (NCES)
Note: Paper presented at "The Troubled Adolescent: The Nation's Concern and Its Response" (Milwaukee, WI, April 9-11, 1991).