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ERIC Number: ED337242
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Apr-18
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Influences of Culture and Schooling on Mothers' Models of Infant Care.
LeVine, Robert A.; And Others
This study considered three hypotheses: (1) cultures differ in the extent to which they represent infants as capable of vocal communication; (2) mothers' models of infant communication are influenced by their experiences in school; and (3) mothers' models of infant communication affect maternal responsiveness during the first 6 months of the infant's life. The first hypothesis is confirmed by ethnographic reports that in some societies, infants are believed to be incapable of communication and are not engaged in conversation, while in other societies, interactive speech involving 6-month-olds is reported. The second and third hypotheses were confirmed by a study of Mexican mothers and infants. Mothers were surveyed about their beliefs concerning infant readiness for verbal communication, and mother interactions with their 5-month-old infants were observed in the home. In the survey, mothers who attended school longer gave younger estimates of the age at which infants recognize the maternal voice. Mothers who gave younger estimates were observed to respond to a larger proportion of infant babbles. Nine references are included. (BC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Baby Talk; Mexico
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (Seattle, WA, April 18-20, 1991).