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ERIC Number: ED336938
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Learning Via the Socratic Method: The Use of the Concept Attainment Model in Foreign Language Classes.
Louvet, Marie-Cecile
The Concept Attainment Model is a teaching strategy based on analysis of the nature of concepts and how they are acquired. Using this theory, three strategies for second language instruction have been developed: the reception, selection, and unorganized materials strategies. In the reception strategy, the most structured, students must be guided carefully in early classes. After choosing a grammar rule to be studied, the teacher creates sentences illustrating it (positive exemplars) and sentences in which it does not apply (negative exemplars). Students analyze the positive exemplars for common attributes, contrasting them with absence of those attributes in negative exemplars. Then students must identify unlabeled sentences as positive or negative exemplars. The selection strategy begins with unlabeled exemplars, and students must group them and develop hypotheses about their attributes. Most successful with advanced students dealing with literature or social studies immersion, the unorganized materials strategy requires students to identify attributes, not always explicit, of concepts asserted verbally in text. All three strategies use analytical and evaluative thinking skills during the concept attainment lesson, focusing on teacher objectives, general content, and the process being used. The method is exciting for students, forcing them to think and participate. Specific examples are provided of how the three strategies can be used in classrooms. (MSE)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Administrators; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Socratic Method
Note: In: New Challenges and Opportunities. Dimension: Languages 87. Report of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching, p87-98, 1988. For the proceedings, see FL 019 352.