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ERIC Number: ED336225
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Measuring Intelligence of Minority Children in Canadian Multicultural Contexts.
Tamaoka, Katsuo
Heavy migration into Canada and migration from Native rural communities to urban areas has made it necessary to identify appropriate instruments for assessing minority children's academic abilities. In Canada, IQ tests have been used extensively for academic placement in school. This paper reviews the literature evaluating cultural bias in IQ tests used in Canada and the United States. Studies conducted in the United States suggest that Blacks and Hispanics are at a cultural disadvantage on the major IQ tests, while Hispanics are disadvantaged in language skills as well. With respect to the mainstream Canadian population, the WISC and WISC-R contain items reflecting an American cultural bias. However, Canadianization of such items may not guarantee the proper difficulty level for the substituted items. Cultural bias against Native children is found on some WISC-R items, and degree of acculturation seems to influence IQ results of Native children. Alternative means of assessing minority children's intelligence have included culture-free (or culture-fair) tests, and recalculation of IQ scores taking into account family size, family structure, socioeconomic status, and urban acculturation to indicate "estimated learning potential." These methods did not predict school achievement more accurately than the WISC-R. While the commonly used IQ tests in Canada do not necessarily assess a child's true general ability, they are reasonably predictive of academic success in school (perhaps partly because they reflect cultural biases in school). A multiple assessment approach for minority children is recommended. This paper contains 39 references. (SV)
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Canada; United States