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ERIC Number: ED336074
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Guided Instruction with Logo Programming and the Development of Cognitive Monitoring Strategies among College Students.
Lee, Mi Ok C.
This study examined the effects of guided programmed instruction with Logo programming on the development of cognitive processes and thinking skills among college students. Logo programming has been advocated as a powerful tool to help students develop higher order thinking, an awareness of their thinking processes, and problem solving skills; however, it is suggested that Logo programming alone is not enough. Students must develop cognitive monitoring strategies, i.e., strategies that enable them to be independent learners and to transfer learning or training from one situation to another. Guided Logo instruction in this study involved three pedagogical elements: (1) Logo programming was selected as a learning tool to teach cognitive monitoring strategies; (2) an explicit model of cognitive monitoring processes was included in the Logo programming; and (3) explicit teacher mediated instruction of cognitive monitoring activities was facilitated in a Logo programming environment as well as outside of the programming domain. The results of the study demonstrated that the discovery learning and learner control of instruction inherent in guided Logo instruction positively affected both near and far transfer of cognitive monitoring strategies. It is recommended that further research be conducted for longer periods of time, using different academic subject material, younger students, and students of differing achievement levels. (68 references) (Author/DB)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Guided Discovery Approach; Logo Programing Language
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, April 3-7, 1991). Cover title differs.