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ERIC Number: ED335622
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Feb-8
Pages: 47
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Gender across Generations: Patterns of Similarity between Young Adults and Their Middle-Aged and Aging Parents.
Huyck, Margaret Hellie; And Others
Biological sex remains a powerful source of differential socialization and experience. These studies were designed to enhance the understanding of gender identity, the psychosocial aspects of sexual differentiation. The focus was upon changes and continuities, in terms of development along the adult life course and as reflective of social change. Personal reports of characteristics that have been considered indicative of masculinity and femininity were compared for men and women in two generations. Respondents were drawn from a larger study of young adult children and their parents who lived in or around a Midwest suburb. The families were selected to represent the more stable, family-centered, "traditional" segment of contemporary American Society. Study I included analyses of responses by 115 triads of mother, father, and young adult child to a standard measure of gender-linked self-attributions. Study II drew upon personal interview data about gender conceptualizations, and utilized a coding system developed for this research to identify gender-congruent, gender-expanded, and gender-compromised styles of experiencing gender. The sample for Study II included 105 fathers, 134 mothers, 66 sons, and 67 daughters. The analyses provided evidence of differences between generations which may be linked to social changes or to developmental patterns, and continuities which seem to reflect transmission within families and the child's movement into adult family roles. (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Generation Effect
Note: Paper presented at the International Conference on Gender and the Family presented by the Women's Research Institute of Brigham Young University and the Utah Governor's Commission for Women and Families (Provo, UT, February 7-10, 1991).