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ERIC Number: ED335619
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Community Colleges and Adult Needs: Organizational Dynamics, Models, Change Strategies.
Hummel, Mary
Very little research literature exists on organizational change and resistance in student services. In this study six community colleges were selected with two from each of the three size of population categories: small (1,000-2,999), medium (3,000-8,999), and large (9,000 and above). In each size category two institutions were matched, one reported to have adapted and one reported to have not adapted services to meet adult needs. Adaptation was defined as conduct which alters the status quo to meet emerging needs, in this case changes in program delivery to meet the needs of adult learners. A further assessment was done by approximately 60 adult learners surveyed in the classroom at each institution. The results indicated that, in the adaptive student services organizations, change and/or new ideas were viewed as coming from a number of places within the institution, i.e., "bottom up" and/or "top down." Staff members themselves felt they had opportunities for input and morale was high. In the non-adaptive institutions there was less uniformity of opinion about the current situation. High-level administrators viewed the staff as being resistant to change and having low morale. A feeling existed in these institutions that there was not enough staff, money, or commitment to student services or professional development. (Proposed solutions for problems in the areas of organizational models, staff, student activities, and placement are described.) (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College Personnel Association (Washington, DC, March 29-April 1, 1989).