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ERIC Number: ED335152
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Interactive Technology and the Young Child: Insights from Research and Design. Center for Learning Technology Reports and Papers in Progress, Report No. 90-2.
Char, Cynthia A.
This paper offers historical, present, and futuristic perspectives on the role of interactive technology in the lives of young children. In the early 1980s, debate tended to center on the question, "Are computers good for young children?" At the time, educational software consisted almost exclusively of animated drill and practice programs. Now, advances in software technology have resulted in more exploratory, open-ended software programs and tools and better guidelines for evaluating and designing developmentally appropriate software with features intended for 3- to 6-year-olds. In the future, researchers, designers and educators should assume a more active role in determining how technology might enhance young children's learning and development. Interactive technologies might offer children powerful tools and environments for: (1) creating multimedia compositions; (2) enhancing intuitive knowledge and decision-making processes; (3) extending mathematical exploration and problem solving; and (4) supporting social interaction, collaboration, and perspective. Several aspects of young children's use of computers are addressed that illustrate the ways in which technical developments in computer hardware could broaden our conceptions of young children's interactions with technology. A list of 21 references is included. (BC)
Center for Learning Technology, Education Development Center, 55 Chapel Street, Newton, MA 02160 ($3.00).
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.
Identifiers: Technology Assessment
Note: Paper based on presentation delivered at the Annual Conference of the American Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April 16-20, 1990). Illustrations will not reproduce clearly.