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ERIC Number: ED335063
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Dec
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Learning Resource Networks in Postsecondary Education: An Impossible Dream?
Palola, E.
A new level of learning resources is surfacing in many postsecondary institutions, taking one of three principal forms: an independent study model of one-on-one learning, computer communications via e-mail between teachers and learners, or online database searching to facilitate access to information and the use of libraries. The use of these resources presents new challenges for the colleges and their faculty and students. Institutional funding priorities may have to be reassessed so that access to these resources can be fully supported in college budgets. In addition, professors and students may have to rethink their roles in the learning process. Most will need to receive training to utilize the resources effectively in the enhancement of learning. Once the technology has been learned and both students and teachers have the requisite hardware and software, e-mail allows the opportunity for spontaneous, unscheduled, timely communication between professors and students. This removes the difficulties involved in picking appointment times and locations convenient to all parties involved. Online database searching helps professors obtain citations to books and articles on a particular subject, develop bibliographies, direct students to applicable materials, and gain access to information for themselves. Yet, database searching, along with other computer-based learning resources, will not become central or important resources without the direct involvement of the professoriate. Educators should explore questions of student access to computers, help students overcome computer anxiety, encourage student use of computers to communicate with and receive information from faculty, and work directly with students in the development of strategies for computer searching. Technology can help faculty focus time and energy on the intellectual growth and development of students. (JMC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A