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ERIC Number: ED334926
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Apr
Pages: 34
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Comparative Study of Academic Achievement of University Students from the Two Secondary-Systems in Kuwait: 1982 to 1986.
Khammash, Salma B.
The study compared college achievement of Kuwaiti students from two secondary programs; a traditional one resulting in a General Secondary School Certificate (GSSC) and a "Unit Credit System" (UCS) which emphasizes more student independence and responsibility and less rote learning. Under both systems, secondary students specialize in either the arts or sciences. The study sample included 581 students (248 GSSC and 333 UCS) for the College of Arts and 555 students (230 GSSC and 325 UCS) for the College of Science. In an examination of first-year performance, findings indicated that students from the UCS system had slightly higher secondary school percent scores for both sexes and both streams (arts and sciences); female students from both streams and both systems (especially the UCS) performed significantly better than males in the College of Arts; students from the traditional system performed better than UCS students in the College of Science for those who enrolled in 1982-85, males from the traditional system had higher college grade point averages than males from the UCS system; more students from the UCS failed courses than from the GSSC in the Arts college but students from both systems failed in equal numbers in the Science college; and more GSSC students (75% compared to 69%) at the College of Science exhibited normal progress. Results suggest that both secondary systems should continue to be evaluated. (Includes 12 references and 13 tables.) (DB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Kuwait
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April, 1990).