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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: ED334499
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Psychosocial Correlates of Adolescent Substance Use.
Wagner, Eric F.; Shaw, Daniel S.
This study examined psychosocial correlates of substance abuse during late adolescence. Older adolescents' (N=276) aged 17-22, self-reported use of marijuana, cocaine, and other illicit drugs was examined in relation to several psychosocial variables, including sensation seeking, aggression, self-esteem, depression, and perceived peer prevalence and dangerousness of risk-taking activities. Initial multivariate and univariate multiple regression analyses indicated a significant relation between each type of substance use and psychosocial variables found in previous research to be related to substance use (e.g. sensation seeking, perceived negative outcome). Subsequent multivariate and univariate multiple regression analyses examined patterns of association for each sex. In general, relations were somewhat stronger and broader for males. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that among males, high experience seeking and low perceived dangerousness of risk-taking activities were predictive of marijuana use, and low boredom susceptibility and high perceived dangerousness of risk taking activities were negatively correlated with cocaine use. Among females, high experience seeking and high disinhibition were associated with marijuana use. (Data tables are included.) (Author/ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Psychosocial Factors; Risk Taking Behavior
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Society of Behavioral Medicine Scientific Sessions (12th, Washington, DC, March 20-24, 1991).