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ERIC Number: ED334476
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Apr
Pages: 60
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Development of Sex Role Identity in Gifted and Nongifted Children.
Signorello, Rose L.; And Others
This study compared gifted elementary and middle school students to nongifted students to assess differences in levels of masculinity and femininity across grade levels. The following hypotheses were tested: in grades three through eight gifted females will have greater levels of masculinity than nongifted females and the differences between gifted and nongifted females will be greater than males classified similarly; and in grades three through eight gifted males will have greater levels of femininity than nongifted males and the differences between gifted and nongifted males will be greater than females classified similarly. The Children's Personal Attributes Questionnaire Short Form was administered to students in grades three through eight. Analysis of 386 questionnaires indicated that children classified as gifted and nongifted differed significantly in levels of masculinity. There was a significant interaction between gender and giftedness for femininity. Gifted males exhibited a significantly higher level of femininity than nongifted males, but females classified similarly did not differ. In addition, femininity tended to decline at higher grade levels for both males and females, both gifted and nongifted. This research provides data which indicate the gifted may interpret role patterns differently from the nongifted. The notion that the intellectually gifted may also be psychosocially distinct with respect to sex role identity is supported if the cognitive-developmental theoretical perspective is followed. (LLL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Southwestern Psychological Association (37th, New Orleans, LA, April 11-13, 1991).