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ERIC Number: ED333484
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Gold from the South: Hispanic Literature.
Fuchs, Lucy
New Hispanic immigrants to the United States bring with them a different world view and a desire to succeed in a new country. They also find resistance to their presence, prejudice against their language, and ignorance of their customs on the part of many older, more settled Americans. In addition, children quickly learn that their old customs are not valued by the larger population, and often adopt this disdain for their family traditions. But these children are paying too high a price for their assimilation, as they are losing their own characteristics, traditions, and values. Most Americans are woefully ignorant of all aspects of Latin American life. Through Latin American stories such as "The Legend of Food Mountain,""Atariba and Niguayona,""Mother Scorpion Country,""The Invisible Hunters," and "How We Came to the Fifth World" among others, Americans can learn to appreciate the many facets of culture that Hispanics bring to this country. In addition to offering these stories, teachers can use activities such as comparing creation stories, inviting immigrants, and celebrating Hispanic holidays to help children to understand the stories and the cultures of Hispanic Americans. (A list of 16 classroom activities is attached.) (PRA)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Hispanic Literature
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council of Teachers of English (Indianapolis, IN, March 14-16, 1991).