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ERIC Number: ED333312
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Aug-12
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
The Moral and Ethical Orientations of Islam and Other Revealed Religions: A Comparative Perspective.
Abedin, Saleha M.
Islam is the dominant religion in some parts of Africa, Asia and Europe, and in all of North Africa and the Middle East. Muslim minority communities are found in almost all countries in the world. In social sciences, religion is defined as a system of ideas and institutions that have emerged in response to man's search for meaning, purpose, and security. However, in Islam, religion is defined as a complete way of life that has been handed down to man by Allah for the guidance and welfare of mankind for all times and for all places. Thus, Islam's definition of religion differs from that in the social sciences and at the same time, it forms the basis of the difference between Islam on the one hand, and Judaism and Christianity on the other. For more than any other revealed religion, Islam emphasizes adherence to the revealed message without any degree of change or adjustment in the original message, and derives guidance in all affairs and legislation in all matters from the original message as revealed in the Quaran, and explained through the traditions of the Prophet Mohammad. This is the basis of the difference between Islam and other religions which have accepted and incorporated man made laws and changes. (Some specific differences among Islam, Christianity, and Judaism are discussed in the areas of commitment to beliefs and rituals; definition of sacred and profane; law as the source of norms; the monotheistic principles; private verus collective interest; social consequences of individual verus group orientation; and value orientation). (Author/BHK)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (98th, Boston, MA, August 10-14, 1990).