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ERIC Number: ED333254
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Aug
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Childhood PTSD in Israel: A Cross Cultural Frame of Reference.
Milgram, Noach Norman
There is considerable awareness among Israeli mental health workers and citizens of the importance of differentiating between acute or chronic reactions to severely stressful life situations and manifestations of mental illness and anxiety, or developmental and adjustment disorders. Israeli mental health workers have become expert and are heavily committed to treating stress-related phenomena. While manuals are available for dealing with stress reactions in school children, teachers, and mental health personnel themselves, these manuals present little systematic data on the pervasiveness of stress reactions. In spite of the ubiquitous nature of war stress-related phenomena in Israeli society, there have been no large-scale epidemiological studies of stress-related reactions and disorders in Israeli children and youth for any decade. Two major reviews of the clinical studies in the field cite data on anxiety levels in children as a function of the ideological and ecological features of their community, demographic variables, and the degree of traumatization they have faced. Ideological biases of both the investigator and the clients can determine what is attended to and how it is interpreted and treated. The ideological bias of the investigator can cause researchers to diagnose stress-related psychopathlogy in children where it does not exist or to avoid seeing it where it does. Such ideological biases complicate the process of identifying and treating Israeli children who may suffer from war-related posttraumatic stress disorders. The same caveats may also apply to working with Palestinian children. (NB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Israel; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (98th, Boston, MA, August 10-14, 1990).