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ERIC Number: ED332202
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Learning to Teach Literature in California: Challenging the Rules for Standardized Instruction. Research Series No. 200.
Hollingsworth, Sandra; And Others
A longitudinal study, involving five beginning teachers, revolved around questions about how teachers' own emerging theories of literacy instruction are shaped by their interactions with other theories and perspectives and through their own work with students who are learning to read, write, and understand text in schools. Trained in the whole language or process approach to literature, the teachers in this study found it difficult to implement that approach with inner-city African-American, Latino, and Filipino students. The purpose of the study was both to inform teacher education policy and to provide teacher educators with ideas for better supporting beginning teachers. Triangulated data sources which documented the new teachers' learning consisted of audiotaped transcripts of monthly collaborative meetings and bimonthly videotaped classroom observations of literacy lessons as well as audiotaped open-ended interviews with the teachers. These teachers' experiences suggest at least three areas for reform in literacy education: reconsidering programmatic attention to beginning reading; integrating knowledge of literacy and school cultures; and redefining the boundaries of teacher education. All of the teachers found that sticking to the popular and policy-imposed "rules" for using original literature in any form was inappropriate for many children. The stories told by these teachers suggest that it may be beneficial to support beginning teachers internally as they are learning to teach literature. Without this support, the difficulty in learning to teach a literature-based, whole-language program designed to give all children access to literacy may lie with the institutional rules in schools and not with the new teachers. (Eighteen references are attached.) (MG)
Institute for Research on Teaching, College of Education, 252 Erickson Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1034 ($3.00).
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for Research on Teaching.
Identifiers: California (San Francisco Peninsula)