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ERIC Number: ED332184
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Relationship between the Portfolio Method of Teaching Writing and Measures of Personality and Motivation.
Miller, Emily P.; RiCharde, R. Stephen
Inspired by the researcher's interest in the subject, but also in response to state-mandated assessment, Virginia Military Institute (VMI) initiated a pilot program to evaluate the portfolio method of teaching writing. Half of VMI's English department used the portfolio approach, while the other half applied other teaching methods. Prior research suggested that the portfolio approach should increase both writing skill and efficacy because it: (1) encourages revision skills development; (2) allows students to set goals; (3) promotes long-term effort; (4) involves self-assessment; and (5) evaluates students on the basis of their best work. Results of the study indicated that efficacy varied according to grade and also, to a large extent, according to whether a given student was in a portfolio class. Portfolio students felt more confident than other students in their writing abilities in several specific areas. Motivational and behavioral factors were more significant in portfolio than in non-portfolio classes. The portfolio method seemed to tap metacognitive skills. There seemed to be correlations with learning styles in portfolio classes only. Educators need to find more ways of helping students to develop self-monitoring abilities. Because the portfolio method lends itself well to individualized instruction, it may offer teachers an excellent opportunity to improve the writing skills of all students. (Eleven tables are included; 30 references are attached.) (SG)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Self Monitoring; Virginia Military Institute; Writing Contexts
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (42nd, Boston, MA, April 21-23, 1991).